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Theory v. Practice
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Conclusion
Conclusion
  
  

Biodiversity and Species Protection
the economic perspective


Conclusion

  

The protection of biodiversity and endangered species is currently expensive, time- consuming, and to some extent, ineffective.

Studies suggest that market-based incentives have greater likelihood of ensuring that private landowners will cooperate with legislation that restricts their development opportunities.

Many Bald Eagles

 

 

 

 

 

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Prevention is the best strategy for endangered species management.  Early detection of at-risk species provides managers with more options and greater flexibility in designing and conducting successful recovery programs.  Quick action and flexibility also reduce the need for costly crisis management and its potential for adversely affecting human activities and disrupting local or regional economies. Habitat loss and habitat fragmentation (the breaking up of habitat into small, unconnected pieces) are two of the most significant causes of species extinctions throughout the world today.  As local populations within a species decline in number and become separated from one another, species becomes more vulnerable to extinction, and recovery becomes increasingly difficult and costly.

Since prevention is the best cure, the market incentive systems are likely to achieve more results than after-the-fact measures.


The School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Copyright 1999 Indiana University Bloomington
Comments: kenricha@indiana.edu